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November 4, 2015

NEW RESOURCE FROM DAMEC

A new resource has been produced by the Drug and Alcohol Multicultural Education Centre (DAMEC) which explains different types of drug and alcohol treatment, how to access treatment services, support available for friends/family, plus other commonly asked questions in simple, non-medical language. This resource is suitable for clients with low English literacy, people not familiar with health and treatment systems, migrants, refugees and asylum seekers.

Read more and download the report here

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April 24, 2015

WORKING WITH CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE ADOLESCENTS

The Australian Institute of Family Studies has published a practitioner resource titled "Working with culturally and linguistically diverse adolescents."  The resource includes a broad range of information to support workers, including reports, policy papers and practice guides, information on intake / assessments of young people from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) background, as well as a directory of key contacts for practitioners working with CALD young people.

Find out more about "Working with culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) adolescents"

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September 12, 2014

WORKING WITH DIVERSITY IN ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG SETTINGS

The NSW peak body for the non-government alcohol and other drug sector (NADA) has published a resource titled "Working with diversity in alcohol and other drug settings."  The resource contains examples of best practice approaches as well as useful resources for service providers.  The resource covers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse communities, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex people and older people.

Download "Working with diversity in alcohol and other drug settings" (1.1MB PDF)

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February 14, 2014

SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF KHAT (CATHA EDULIS)

Khat (Catha edulis) is a plant that grows in north eastern Africa and parts of the Middle East.  The fresh leaf of the plant is chewed in some communities, creating a mild stimulant effect.  As people from some of these regions have moved abroad, the practice of chewing Khat leaf has followed, raising concerns about potential harms particularly in the United Kingdom and Europe, but also in some parts of Australia.  A systematic review has recently been published titled "Khat (Catha edulis): A systematic review of evidence and literature pertaining to its harms to UK users and society."  The article brings together some of the research into the traditional uses of Khat and considers some of the possible impacts of Khat use, particularly in migrant communities.

Go to "Khat (Catha edulis): A systematic review of evidence and literature pertaining to its harms to UK users and society."

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July 20, 2012

CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND CHILD PROTECTION

This paper reviews the research into the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) families with regards to child protection.  With one in four Australians born overseas, a significant body of research and policy has been developed around many issues faced by migrant communities, however there remains large gaps in the child protection literature.  This paper serves as a launch pad, by reviewing current research on the needs of migrant and refugee communities and identifying gaps and priorities for future research.

Download "Cultural Diversity and Child Protection" (1.3MB PDF)

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April 26, 2012

WORKING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE FROM A REFUGEE BACKGROUND

The Centre for Multicultural Youth (CMY) have published a fact sheet designed to assist workers who are engaged with young people from a refugee background. The fact sheet contains facts and figures, as well as information about the unique experiences and challenges faced by refugee young people as they start out in the Australian community.

Download the fact sheet here

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July 8, 2011

SPEAK UP: YOUNG PEOPLE HAVING A SAY

The Australian Youth Affairs Coalition (AYAC) are working with Plan International to run consultations with young people around their views on ending poverty, both in Australia and around the world.   They are particularly interested in speaking with young people who have disengaged from education, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people, and young people who are newly arrived in Australia.

If you want to learn more about the project, or if you know of groups of young people that might want to be involved in the consultation, contact Jacqui at AYAC by email (Jacqui@ayac.org.au) or phone 02 9212 0500

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