E-CIGARETTES: AN EVIDENCE UPDATE

August 28, 2015

E-CIGARETTES: AN EVIDENCE UPDATE

Public Health England has published a research report titled "E-cigarettes: An evidence update". E-cigarettes, devices which heat a capsule of nicotine in a propylene glycol or glycerine base into a vapour, mimics the sensation of cigarette smoking, but without lots of the dangerous chemicals in tobacco smoke.  E-cigarettes remain illegal in Queensland, while there has been a dearth of evidence about their safety or efficacy. This latest research review from Public Health England is a welcome addition to the literature.  They found that e-cigs are 95% less harmful to health than normal cigarettes, and when supported by a smoking cessation service, they help most smokers quit altogether.  They found that while there has been a steady increase in the use of e-cigs in England, rates of tobacco smoking in young people have continued to decline.  They found that e-cigs are used almost exclusively among people who have already smoked, reducing the fear that e-cigs could be a gateway to commence tobacco smoking.  The report also found that e-cigs release a negligible level of nicotine into ambient air, with no risks to bystanders through passive consumption. There remain concerns about quality control of specific e-cig products, with some variation noted amongst particular devices and nicotine capsules.


Go to "E-cigarettes: An evidence update"